History of Economic Thought

The Institute for New Economic Thinking takes a broad view of economic research and supports it in many ways: through its main grant program, through working groups it organizes, and via conferences, panels, and other smaller gatherings of scholars across the globe.

Institute scholars normally publish their work in journals and books. While many – but far from all – of this work appears in working papers sponsored by the Institute and other leading research forums, the Institute also attempts to make its research results accessible to a wider public on its website. Below is a sampling of interviews featuring Institute scholars explaining the significance of their research in non-technical terms.

Paul Krugman on the MIT History

  My friend and "grown-up kid" Yann Giraud just called my attention to Paul Krugman's recent column, "Empire of the Institute", on Roy Weintraub's recently edited HOPE volume " Read more

Finding Till Düppe

NB : once again, I am stepping out of my - self-inflicted - retreat to write on this blog, of which I am not supposed to be a permanent member anymore. Sorry for this self-indulgence. Read more

Why Don't Economists Go to Hollywood Parties?

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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History of policy evaluation: a few questions

I need a history of policy evaluation. I want my students to know why and how the theories, tools and practices they will later use on a daily basis were conceived and spread, and a good 80% of them will participate in a policy evaluation in the next 10 years. This need also derives from my research program, aimed at understanding the transformation of applied economics between 1965 and 1985. Policy analysis is a large part of what economists mean by ''applying economics.” It is area of expertise most emphasized in the ongoing advertising campaign designed to reemphasize economists' contribution to society. Read more

Coyle's "Wordly Philosophers 2.0": Suggested Readings

Diane Coyle has a list of twelve economists who she argues "clearly shaped the character of economics in a meaningful and lasting way – going up to the early 1980s." As such, they would form the basis of the 12 chapters of the follow up to Heilbroner's The Worldly Philosophers. Below is the, with link to some autobiographical reflexions by those economists, and pieces where historians examine their wordviews. Read more

History of Postwar Economics: suggested readings (in progress)

Diane Coyle is asking why most history of economics' narratives end up with Keynes. My response is : 

1. No, it's not. There has been a surge in history of postwar economics research in the past 15 years. The transformation of economics in the Cold War era in now well-understood, and less is know about the 1965-1985 era (a flaw many researchers, including me, are trying to correct). Read more

Yes indeed, we can blog it!

Last year I pointed out here (and here) that macroeconomists were making themselves comfortable in the blogosphere to discuss theoretical, methodological, and, why not, historical issues of their field (see also a nice post by our fellow kid, Beatrice). Read more

Bernard Maris (1946-2015), Charlie Hebdo and Incommensurability

As you may remember, I had decided to cease contributing to this blog a few months ago.  Nevertheless, I thought I could use my completely illegitimate administrator rights to post one last piece dealing with the recent events in France. To be clear, what I am going to say is not very deep. The events are too recent and painful. They left me speechless for a couple of days and there's nothing really bright that can be said on such a dramatic occasion. Read more

By the Way, Why Does the History of the JEL Codes Matter ?

Full paper is here. Comments are much welcome.And because it’s an epic story (and because I suck at writing abstracts), here is an audio trailer. I thank Paul for his beautiful Memphis accent. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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They called it a sunspot

Coauthored with Aurélien Saidi.

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