Inequality

The Measurement and Assessment of Inequalities on a World Scale

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This project will extend the work of the University of Texas Inequality Project, permitting new data development and research in two technical and at least three substantive areas. The technical projects are: (1) updating the core global inequality data-sets from 2000 through the Great Financial Crisis; (2) GIS mapping of changing inequalities using global and national data.  The substantive projects include: (1) assessment of the effects of financial crisis on inequality;  (2)  inequality and demographic factors, including health, life expectancy and fertility; and (3) a comparative assessment of social, political and financial factors that reduce and increase inequality.

Azim Premji Summer School

Azim Premji University and the Institute for New Economic Thinking ran their first Advanced Graduate Workshop in Indian Development from July 9-15, 2012. The workshop was open to advanced Ph.D. social science students in any Indian university and explored critical debates in Indian economic development. The workshop was devoted to identifying the complex interactions that have influenced India’s trajectory of development and to conceive of development strategies that might be successful in promoting equitable growth, building workforce capabilities, and reducing poverty. Read more

Robert and Edward Skidelsky -The Good Life & Noneconomic Innovation 2/3

In the second part of this three-part INET "From the Director's Chair" interview, INET Executive Director Robert Johnson talks with Robert Skidelsky and his son Edward Skidelsky about their book, How Much is Enough? Money and the Good Life. Read more

Robert and Edward Skidelsky - Reimagining the Good Life 3/3

In the third part of this three-part INET "From the Director's Chair" interview, INET Executive Director Robert Johnson talks with Robert Skidelsky and his son Edward Skidelsky about their book, How Much is Enough? Money and the Good Life. Inequality is now rampant all over the world, particularly in the U.S., and they suggest that this was a development Keynes had not foreseen when he famously forecast that the need for growth would be finished by the end of the 20th century. Read more

Robert and Edward Skidelsky - How Much is Enough? 1/3

In the first part of this three-part INET "From the Director's Chair" interview, INET Executive Director Robert Johnson talks with Robert Skidelsky and his son Edward Skidelsky about their book, How Much is Enough? Money and the Good Life. Read more

Video: Joseph Stiglitz on How America As Land of Opportunity Has Vanished

The havoc wrought by our recent global financial crisis has vividly demonstrated the deficiencies in our outdated economic theories and shown the need for new economic thinking. Inequality has been one of the key gaps in orthodox economics, and it is one of the areas INET has targeted for new economic thinking to make an impact.

This INET-produced interview features Joseph Stiglitz describing the enormous amount of wealth controlled by the top one percent in America. Here is an exclusive preview of the Stiglitz short interview – for the full interview visit Vanity Fair:

 

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INET Spotlight - Joe Stiglitz and the Vicious Cycle of Economic Inequality

The refrain for some time now has been that the economy will decide the upcoming U.S. election. But Joe Stiglitz offers some much needed focus to this discussion.

“America’s growing inequality is likely to play an important role in this election,” he says. “And rightly so.” Read more

Joe Stiglitz on the 1%'s Problem and the Price of Inequality

Inequality isn't just a problem for the 99%.

This is the message that Nobel laureate and INET Advisory Board member Joe Stiglitz gives as he takes on inequality in his new book, released today, The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future. Read more

INET Spotlight: Jamie Galbraith

What has been driving the worldwide growth of inequality, both within and between countries? Jamie Galbraith has an idea: “Surely financial policies strike me as a very plausible culprit.” Read more

Manufacturing jobs will disappear - no matter where you are

just as the agricultural share of employment has fallen from 40% in the 1920s to less than 2% of the workforce in Europe today, manufacturing's share of employment will fall to less than 5% of employment. That is not jyst for Europe, according to Adair Turner's excellent dinner speech, but that is across the world. He has pointed out that it is not an issue of international transfer of jobs (although it dominates headlines) but it is because of innovation which makes the productivity of (manufacturing) labour increasinglty higher. As that happens, less and less labour input will be needed to prodcue the tangile products we need - hey, even China's manufacturing workforce has been falling for a decade - and the logical conclusion of such a tendency is that we won't need as much labour. Read more