Yann Giraud

Assistant Professor of Economics

I am a historian of economics. My main topic is the history of visualization in recent economics. I study how diagrams, graphs, pictures and tables have been used by economists as means of theorizing and/or for educational purposes. My most recent work is concerned with the history of economic education in the United States in the postwar period. I am interested in the way changes in economics textbooks and curriculums, as well as the more institutional debates within the economics professions, have reflected and/or affected the development of economic theorizing and its role in dealing with social issues. Broadly speaking, I am interested in how the development of economic methods is entrenched in peculiar communities and cultural practices. I am curious about how far we can go in using science studies and cultural history as role models for writing interesting new narratives in the history of economics. I am an assistant-Professor and a researcher at THEMA (CNRS UMR 8184) and I teach economics and management at the University of Cergy-Pontoise and at Sciences-Po Saint-Germain-en-Laye. I am also a member of the organizing committee of HISRECO (History of Recent Economics Conference) and co-organizer of the History of 'Economics as Culture' workshop.

Besides, I am a huge fan of modern music, ranging from pastoral indie pop and classic rock records to some extremely noisy and buzzy experimental stuff

My Content

NB : once again, I am stepping out of my - self-inflicted - retreat to write on this blog, of which I am not supposed to be a permanent member anymore. Sorry for this self-indulgence.

As you may remember, I had decided to cease contributing to this blog a few months ago.  Nevertheless, I thought I could use my completely illegitimate administrator rights to post one last piece dealing with the recent events in France. To be clear, what I am going to say is not very deep. The events are too recent and painful. They left me speechless for a couple of days and there's nothing really bright that can be said on such a dramatic occasion.

This year, the History of Economics Society (HES) meeting was organized at the University of Quebec at Montreal. The meeting was, on the whole, a nice affair, there were plenty of interesting sessions, I reconvened with old friends and was able to present there my latest work and receive constructive comments.

It is often argued that in recent years the question of the 'dissemination' of economic knowledge has been increasingly addressed by historians of economics. However, as our buddy Tiago has noted on the previous version of this blog quite some time ago, historians seem to not really know what they're talking about when they talk about 'dissemination'. In fact, I would argue that most accounts of the history of science - and therefore, of economics - should deal with the question of dissemination, as science itself is "a form of communicative action" (Secord, 2004).

Naomi KleinYesterday, I had my first introductory economics seminar with my new students. At the end of this 4-hour marathon, which included the definition of economics and some preliminary knowledge on methodology, economic history and the history of the discipline, one of my students, who, I had noticed, stared at me quite incredulously during my speech, approached me and asked me in an aside: "Mr. Giraud, have you read the Shock Doctrine?".