The Institute for New Economic Thinking

The Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) was created to broaden and accelerate the development of new economic thinking that can lead to solutions for the great challenges of the 21st century.

The havoc wrought by our recent global financial crisis has vividly demonstrated the deficiencies in our outdated current economic theories, and shown the need for new economic thinking – right now.

INET is supporting this fundamental shift in economic thinking through research funding, community building, and spreading the word about the need for change. We already are a global community of thousands of new economic thinkers, ranging from Nobel Prize winning economists to teachers and students who have emerged out from the shadows of prevailing economic thought, attracted by the promise of a free and open economic discourse.

We are constantly devising ways to support the next generation of economics scholars, by providing money, advice, access to like-minded individuals and new outlets for their ideas, including the widespread use of web video and social media.

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A Three-Day Conference Exploring the Impact of Innovation on Society

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By Elham Saeidinezhad, Jay Pocklington, Michael Beall, and Yakov Feygin

What exactly is an exchange rate?

We all know that one of the main challenges in the study of international finance...

If you're attending the EEA conference look below to see where you'll find stimulating discussions involving the Institute community.

Click here for more information including the full EEA program...

Inflation targeting insufficient: central banks and governments must manage the quantity and mix of credit created

FRANKFURT, 10 February 2014 — Financial reforms introduced since the crisis have been valuable but still have not addressed the fundamental...

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About the Interview

If you want to understand how fund managers choose a portfolio, why not ask them? That’s what David Tuckett does: he draws on standard sociological techniques of interviewing to understand investors’ decisions to buy or sell assets. He says financial markets cannot be driven by economic fundamentals – because the future is uncertain – instead, they are driven by stories about fundamentals. David Tuckett merges insights from Keynes, from sociology, and from psychoanalysis to develop what he calls emotional finance – this is new economic thinking.