Dirk J. Bezemer

Associate Professor
University of Groningen

Dirk Bezemer holds a PhD in economics (Amsterdam) and two MSc degrees in agriculture (Wageningen). He was a researcher at Imperial College (Univ.  London) and worked in policy advice (ODI) and in the UK civil service (DfID)on development economics issues before joining Groningen University where he is an Associate Professor.  His work is published in Advances in Complex Systems, Accounting, Organizations and Society, the World Bank Research Observer, the Journal of Development Studies, World Development, Economic Systems, Comparative Economic Studies, the Journal of Economic Issues and the Cambridge Journal of Economics, among others.

His 2009-2010 work on financial fragility and economic models was widely quoted. His present research is on the monetary causes and consequences of the crisis, including research on the Great (Im) moderation, effects of quantitative easingand the ongoing commodity price bubble (with UNCTAD). He is inspired by Keynes, Schumpeter, Minsky and Godley and works with Steve Keen and Michael Hudson, among others.

Dirk Bezemer contributed to key policy reports by the OECD and World Bank advised the Dutch labour unions the Latvian social-democrats and wrote a strategy report for the Dutch development bank FMO.  In 2010 he convened ECB, and European Commission representativesat a Groningen workshop the financial sector in macro models. In 2011 he organized a seminar with YanisVaroufakis  on solutions to the Eurocrisis. He contributes regularly in the Dutch press and is a frequent invited speaker at international conferences as well as student meetings. His research into an empirical model for the financial sector’s role in growth and in crisis was funded by INET in spring 2011.

My Content

Presentation given at Bridging Silos, Breaking Silences: New Responses to Instability and Inequality Desmond Tutu Center, New York November 4-6, 2011

My Video Content

See video

Dirk Bezemer, Associate Professor, University of Groningen, speaking at the breakout panel entitled "How Can We Create a Financial System That Is Socially Useful?" at the Institute for New Economic Thinking's (INET) Paradigm Lost Conference in Berlin. April 14, 2012. #inetberlin

See video

Discussion and Q&A at the breakout panel entitled "How Can We Create a Financial System That Is Socially Useful?" at the Institute for New Economic Thinking's (INET) Paradigm Lost Conference in Berlin. April 14, 2012. #inetberlin

See video

At least since Joseph Schumpeter we know that credit is good for economic growth. At least since 2007 we know that too much credit foreshadows financial turmoil. Inspired by Keynes and Minsky, Dirk Bezemer pieces together a cross-country data set of credit and debt, investigating whether the two faces of credit are different for different forms of credit. And using agent-based modeling, he strives to capture the interaction between the financial and the real -- this is new economic thinking.

My Grants

The financial sector is vital to economic growth; but finance is also a cause of crises. This two-sided potential is missing in most of today’s theoretical models and empirical research – the key reason why the 2007-8 credit crisis came as a surprise to leading policy and research institutions.