Beatrice Cherrier

Jedi by day, wanabee historian of economics by night. 

Battlefield: Initially studied some postwar economists' writings and intimate worldviews. Now trying to figure out how and under which influences those idiosyncratic visions confront, compromise and combine into groups, departments, schools, institutions, communities, subdisciplines and eventually economics as a science, a public object, a culture. Current targets: JEL codes, coordination failures, public economics, urban economics,macroscale models, and all things applied. 

Favorite weapon: archive work. Looking at oral history with terror and at new methods such as network analysis and quantitative prosopography with awe and a tint of skepticism

Strategy: writing history of economics not only as a history of theorizing but also as a tale of educating, recruiting, funding, advising, engineering, applying, popularizing, fighting, talking, reading, hearing, innovating, failing, etc.

Looking for: Fun, feedback and suggestions

Academic identification: Beatrice Cherrier is assistant professor at the University of Caen, where she researches alongside social choice theorists and teaches in the urban studies and social work department. Prior to that, she conducted archive-based research on the history of economics at MIT, funded by the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University. She completed her history of economics Ph.D. on “The Relationships Between Economists’ Values and Their Science: The Case of Gunnar Myrdal, Jacob Marschak and Milton Friedman” in November 2008 at the University of Paris X-Nanterre, France. She also writes for the Institute for New Economic Thinking’s History of Economics Playground blog and participated in the Institute’s Bridging Silos, Breaking Silences conference in November 2011.

More information here

My Content

In the spring of 1940, as the war in Europe escalated and the likelihood of American involvement grew greater and greater, scientists understood that they would soon be drafted to help national defense planning. In an effort to control the process, several scholarly oriented institutions, including the Social Science Research Council and the American Council of Learned Societies recommended the establishment of “a national agency for the registry and procurement of scientific personnel.” Christened the National Roster of Scientific and Specialized Personnel, the governmental organization set out to send a general questionnaire and a disciplinary “technical check list” of subject matters to all scientists in the country.
Episode I and Episode II; Background chronology of economics at Carnegie.
I've already blogged on how undergraduate education evolved at MIT in the postwar era here and here, but since Mike Konczal and Paul Krugman make the case that, to bring introductory economics closer to the real world, macro should be taught before micro as Samuelson did in the first 13 editions of his Economi
So, most Nobel Prize exegetes went a long way, this week, toward explaining that asset pricing is not primarily born out of theoretical reflection but out of prize-deserving empirical work.John Cochrane, for instance, writes about efficient markets that: