Databases

Diego Comin – Why New Technologies Do Not Make Poor Countries Rich

 
Over the past two hundred years, poor countries have become faster at adopting the technologies of rich countries. So why is it, the economist asks, that poor countries have remained poor, by and large? The answer, Diego Comin says, is that poor countries use technologies less intensely: fewer people use less advanced computers less often. To find out why – finance, institutions, geography? – Diego amasses data to measure the diffusion of technologies over two centuries. Compiling a big data set to study the drivers of technology adoption – this is new economic thinking.
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Margaret Levenstein - Financing Innovation or Speculation, the Case of Cleveland

About the Interview

Did you know that around 1920 Cleveland, Ohio, had a technological cutting edge not unlike Silicon Valley today? Probably you didn't, because Cleveland lost its edge during the Great Depression, and its innovation networks were never heard of again. Margaret Levenstein tells the story how, in the late 1920s, local investors who used to fund local inventors started speculating in New York instead, and the innovation networks broke down. This is not a story only about Cleveland, Ohio. This is painstaking research yielding a unique relational database to answer questions about the long-term costs of macroeconomic instability - this is new economic thinking. Read more

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Emergency Preservation of Federal Bankruptcy Court Records, 1940-2000

Project Members: 

We will document long-run trends in personal bankruptcy, with special emphasis on the use of the bankruptcy law at the local level and among women. Existing sources of data on bankruptcy are inadequate for careful analysis local or disaggregated trends. Read more

English Agricultural Markets and the State: The Corn Returns

Project Leader: 

At the urging of the Georgical Committee of the Royal Society, from 1685 the English Parliament required regular reporting of the average prices and quantities of six agricultural commodities (wheat, rye, barley, oats, beans and peas) sold in specified maritime ports and inland market towns. Read more

Understanding Finance's Potential for Growth and for Crisis

Project Leader: 

The financial sector is vital to economic growth; but finance is also a cause of crises. This two-sided potential is missing in most of today’s theoretical models and empirical research – the key reason why the 2007-8 credit crisis came as a surprise to leading policy and research institutions. Read more

Economics Not Pushing the Power of Computers - J Doyne Farmer

J. Doyne Farmer, professor at the Santa Fe Institute, notes that data sets in economics research are not nearly as complicated as those generated in other sciences. Interviewed by Peter Leyden at King's College, April 2010.

Young People and Technology - David Colander

Middlebury College's David Colander tells INET that technology is changing society, and that it should be allowed to evolve without limitations. Interviewed by Peter Leyden at King's College, April 2010.

John Fullerton Responds to INET Community Members

Our recent video interview with John Fullerton, the founder and President of the Capital Institute, touched on some very profound ideas about how the economy interacts with the biosphere. Read more

Mathematical Formalism and Political-Economic Content - Duncan Foley

The Inaugural Conference @ King's, Institute for New Economic Thinking, Session 6: Mathematical Models: Rigorously Testable, Qualitative Metaphors, or Simply an Entry Barrier.

Mathematical Formalism and Political-Economic Content - Duncan Foley

The Inaugural Conference @ King's, Institute for New Economic Thinking, Session 6: Mathematical Models: Rigorously Testable, Qualitative Metaphors, or Simply an Entry Barrier.