Blogs

Coyle's "Wordly Philosophers 2.0": Suggested Readings

Diane Coyle has a list of twelve economists who she argues "clearly shaped the character of economics in a meaningful and lasting way – going up to the early 1980s." As such, they would form the basis of the 12 chapters of the follow up to Heilbroner's The Worldly Philosophers. Below is the, with link to some autobiographical reflexions by those economists, and pieces where historians examine their wordviews. Read more

History of Postwar Economics: suggested readings (in progress)

Diane Coyle is asking why most history of economics' narratives end up with Keynes. My response is : 

1. No, it's not. There has been a surge in history of postwar economics research in the past 15 years. The transformation of economics in the Cold War era in now well-understood, and less is know about the 1965-1985 era (a flaw many researchers, including me, are trying to correct). Read more

Greece Shows the Limits of Austerity in the Eurozone. What Now?

Mario Seccareccia, professor of economics at the University of Ottawa, has been outspoken in his warnings that austerity policies have the potential to smash economies and spread untold human misery. In his work supported by the Institute for New Economic Thinking and elsewhere, he has challenged deficit hawks and emphasized the need for strong government investment in things like jobs, education, health care, and infrastructure if economies are to prosper. Read more

Yes indeed, we can blog it!

Last year I pointed out here (and here) that macroeconomists were making themselves comfortable in the blogosphere to discuss theoretical, methodological, and, why not, historical issues of their field (see also a nice post by our fellow kid, Beatrice). Read more

Financial Deregulation: A Question of Efficiency or Distribution?

by Anton Korinek and Jonathan Kreamer Read more

Bernard Maris (1946-2015), Charlie Hebdo and Incommensurability

As you may remember, I had decided to cease contributing to this blog a few months ago.  Nevertheless, I thought I could use my completely illegitimate administrator rights to post one last piece dealing with the recent events in France. To be clear, what I am going to say is not very deep. The events are too recent and painful. They left me speechless for a couple of days and there's nothing really bright that can be said on such a dramatic occasion. Read more

Alan Taylor: Surprising New Findings Point to “Perfect Storm” Brewing in Your Financial Future

Featured: Huffington Post | Salon | AlterNet | Truth-Out | Naked Capitalism

Alan Taylor, a professor and Director of the Center for the Evolution of the Global Economy at the University of California, Davis, has conducted, along with Òscar Jordà and Moritz Schularick, ground-breaking research on the history and role of credit, partly funded by the Institute for New Economic Thinking. He finds that today’s advanced economies depend on private sector credit more than anything we have ever seen before. His work and that of his colleagues call into question the assumption that was commonplace before 2008, that private credit flows are primarily forces for stability and predictability in economies.

If current trends continue, Taylor warns, our economic future could be very different from our recent past, when financial crises were relatively rare. Crises could become more commonplace, which will impact every stage of our financial lives, from cradle to retirement. Do we just fasten our seatbelts for a bumpy ride, or is there a way to smooth the path ahead? Taylor discusses his findings and thoughts about how to safeguard the financial system in the interview that follows. Read more

Servaas Storm: Welcome to the European Hunger Games, Brought to You by Mainstream Economics

Featured: Huffington Post | Truth-Out | Naked Capitalism | AlterNet

As a virulent strain of austerity capitalism takes over Europe, leaving shattered lives in its shadow, researchers Servaas Storm and C.W.M. Naastepad, Senior Lecturers in Economics at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands, consider how things got so bad, what role economists and misguided policy-makers have played, and which models and ideas are needed to change course. In the following interview, they discuss how most are getting the story about Europe wrong. They explain how their research shows that when countries try to compete with each other by lowering wages and slashing the social safety net, the costs are high both economically and socially, and why co-operative and regulated capitalism is a far better path. (For more, see “Europe’s Hunger Games: Income Distribution, Cost Competitiveness and Crisis,” published in the Cambridge Journal of Economics, and “Crisis and Recovery in the German Economy: The Real Lessons,” part of the Institute for New Economic Thinking’s project on the “Political Economy of Distribution”).  Read more

The Future of Financial Reform: Conceiving the Financial System of the 21st Century

Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England (BoE) and Chairman of the Financial Stability Board (FSB), may well be the man of the hour. When he gives a speech entitled “The Future of Financial Reform” as he recently did at the Monetary Authority in Singapore, people listen. Read more

By the Way, Why Does the History of the JEL Codes Matter ?

Full paper is here. Comments are much welcome.And because it’s an epic story (and because I suck at writing abstracts), here is an audio trailer. I thank Paul for his beautiful Memphis accent. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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